post-image

What do you wear to work?

News

We all know what you wear at work.

You wear a suit, tie, blazer and dress shirt to work, but what about the rest of us?

What if we asked you to wear something else?

A new study from the University of Queensland and the University at Buffalo has shed some light on what people are wearing at work to suit their busy lives.

It’s a fascinating study, and one that sheds light on how we might look and feel in the workplace.

The research found that when it came to choosing the best clothing, women and men were less likely to wear the same piece of clothing on different days.

The study also found that those who wore a dress shirt and a tie were more likely to stay home from work than those who did not.

It seems that a dresser’s suit and tie make a perfect fit.

When the research was done in 2017, men and women were more similar in the way they wore their clothes on different weeks of the year, with a few exceptions.

It appears that men who were more stressed on the workday were more inclined to wear a dress, with the exception of when they were working during the winter months.

The findings also suggest that when you are feeling more stressed, you may not be wearing the most flattering outfit to match your mood.

“We found that men and female employees were more prone to wearing the same clothing than they were in the past,” said lead author Dr Paul Akerstedt.

“So they were less concerned about being dressed up to go out, and were less inclined to feel comfortable going out and wearing a dress.”

We found the same patterns of wearing were also reflected in the ways people interacted with their coworkers.

It may be that this is a sign that people are more comfortable expressing themselves, and it may also reflect the way that we all interact with each other in the work environment.

“The study found that people were less worried about their appearance when they felt stressed, and that it seemed they were not wearing a uniform to match their mood.

They said this could be because they are more likely than ever to have an identity, and feel they have to be the person they are to fit in.

They were also more likely if they were male to wear more formal clothing, which was a strong trend.

“If we can change the way we think about how we wear our clothes and how we interact with others, then it may be possible to reduce workplace stress and improve employee happiness.” “

These findings are important to consider in terms of the impact of stress on women and their careers, especially in the context of the workplace,” said Dr Akerstead.

“If we can change the way we think about how we wear our clothes and how we interact with others, then it may be possible to reduce workplace stress and improve employee happiness.”

Dr Ackerstedt is a senior lecturer in the Department of Health Psychology at the University.

This article first appeared in The Conversation.

The views expressed in this article are the author’s own and do not necessarily reflect Al Jazeera’s editorial stance.

Tags:
, ,